"Present day geological features found in the Padthaway Viticultural Region formed as a direct result of events occurring during the Cainozoic era."


The “Padthaway” region runs in a Northwest - Southeast direction and cloely follows the Riddoch Highway. The Eastern side of the Riddoch Highway constitutes mainly the Western slope of the Naracoorte Range while the Western side of the highway is predominately flat country where the majority of vines are grown.

Present day geological features found in the Padthaway Viticultural Region formed as a direct result of events occurring during the Cainozoic era.

The South East was inundated by the sea some 40 million years ago, remaining covered for some 25 million years. About 15 million years ago the sea retreated, leaving the Gambier limestone deposits commonly found throughout the Padthaway region.

For a second time the sea inundated the South East and some 2 million years ago climatic changes and uplift of the land surface caused the sea to retreat for a final time. Left behind was a series of ridges parallel to the present coastline, which are the remains of coastal sand dunes
(ref. Mines and Energy).

One of these ridges, known as the West Naracoorte Range, forms the majority of the Padthaway viticultural region.




© 2011 Padthaway Wine Region

Site By Hansen Design & Print